Category Archives: WW1 Tanks

American Tank – World War 1

 

World War 1 American Tank

 

American World War 1 Tank

American World War 1 Tank

The crew of an American World War 1 tank poses next to their machine somewhere in France. It’s interesting to see how big the tank was, which meant that it had a very high silhouette and center of gravity. These design flaws meant that the tank would be unstable and liable to tip over, and also meant that it would make an easier target for enemy gunners. Modern tanks, and even tanks from world war 2 adopted a low profile whihc made them more stable and harder to hit. It also allowed them to use the terrain for cover. This lumbering beast, on the other hand would have been visible from a great distance.

The configuration of the tank’s armament is also unconventional and represents an evolutionary dead end. Unlike modern tanks, this one has its guns mounted on side turrets which cannot be rotated 360 degrees, limiting its offensive capabilities.

In addition to the officers and men standing next to the tank, closeups of the picture reveal other men inside the tank peering out from port holes and hatches.

Note the smiling man peering out from the gun port.

Note the smiling man peering out from the gun port. The gap which allowed the gun to swivel also allowed enemy bullets to potentially come through.

 

american tank crew

A closeup of the front of the tank. A soldier with a gun and bayonet is leaning out of the front hatch.

 

 

Tank Parade, 1918

New Zealand Tank Parade

A large crowd turns out in New Zealand to watch a military parade of tanks go down a city street, in celebration of the end of World War 1. In front are a group of Mark IV Tanks, the British Army’s work horse and main battle tank. It was also used by British allies such as New Zealand and Australia (the so called Anzac forces). In the rear is a Whippet light tank.

Below are various close ups of the crowd and the tanks.

Mark IV TankMake sure to drive slowly! Actually these big lumbering beasts were fairly slow moving even at their top speed.

 

 

Military Parade

Close up of the Buildings in the Background. Note the large number of patriotic spectators waving flags. Many are perched precariously on windows and ledges in order to get a better view.

 

Mark IV Tank

Side View of One of the Mark IV Tanks, bristling with armaments.

 

Whippet Tank

A View of the Whippet Tank

 

Allied Tanks Heading to the Front

Tanks on A TrainAllied tanks are being transported by rail to the Western front while some curious French women look on,  August, 1918. Trains were used to transport tanks to forward staging areas in order to avoid wear on the machines and their treads which were prone to break down. The tanks would then move under their own power from where they were deposited by the train to a staging area behind the trench lines, until it was time to attack.

American Tank in Combat During World War 1

American TankIn this picture a very muddy American tank plows through a German trench during World War I, near Saint Michel, France. The tanks of World War 1 were basically armoured tractors with fairly light armour and armaments. But they were the key to breaking the stalemate on the Western Front because they could ram through barbed wire entanglements, and act as a the sharp wedge breaking open the enemy lines and allowing the infantry to follow and occupy the ground.

 

Tank Tracks

Closeup of Mud Encrusted Tank Threads

 

Tanks Attacking

This photo of allied tanks attacking was taken somewhere on the Western Front in August 1918.

World War 1 Tanks

World War 1 Tanks

A group of allied tanks is advancing up a road, two of which are visible. The tanks are belching clouds of exhaust fumes. Their objective are the German lines in a nearby wood. Meanwhile on the left you can see allied infantry advancing and a line of German prisoners of war being led back into the rear. The location of this photo is unknown.

German Prisoners

Closeup Detail from the Picture Above Showing the German Prisoners Going to the Rear of the Allied Lines

 

 

 

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